Category Archives: Editing

The Literary Game’s New Affiliate Marketing Program

Honest Book Reviews from The Literary Game

Here’s a question for you: Do you have six thousand dollars burning a hole in your pocket right now?

I didn’t think so. Truthfully, neither do I.

The problem is, if you’ve completed your manuscript and are looking to either self-publish it or start pitching agents, you’re going to need it.

Why?

Because a developmental editor costs anywhere from $7.50 to $20 per page (250 words).

Imagine if you have a manuscript for a 90,000 word novel (an average word count). That translates to around 360 pages. At a bare minimum, you’re looking at spending $2,700, although fair rates can reach as high as $7,200.

Until recently, you had three ways to go if you didn’t want to pony up the money to hire a developmental editor:

  1. Skip hiring an editor altogether in a cost-cutting move and proceed forward. This will likely lead to rejections from agents who request your manuscript. You may have a great concept, but you’re only wasting their time and your own if you send them an unfinished product. And if you choose to self-publish, good luck building on an initial reputation for poor quality writing.
  2. Pass your manuscript over to friends to act as beta readers. I hope your friends are trained writers or editors. Also, in most cases, friends want to build your self-esteem. They’ll tell you your manuscript is excellent. It’s not. Not yet, at least. Being as close to the work as they are, writers are terrible at catching their own mistakes. That’s why we need editors.
  3. Hire an editor on the cheap. I’ve done this before and learned my lesson. My co-author Vakasha Brenman and I hired an editor to edit The Book of the Magical Mythical Unicorn for only $750. Her edits were next to useless. Sure, she caught some misplaced commas and gave one or two suggestions (both of which were historically inaccurate and rejected by me and my co-author). Ultimately, we had thrown our money down the drain. Vakasha and I had to spend another year revising The Book of the Magical Mythical Unicorn ourselves, before we had saved enough money to hire a qualified developmental editor. The results speak for themselves: We landed our first choice for a publisher and I was able to promote The Book of the Magical Mythical Unicorn on the top-ranked nighttime radio program.

Obviously, none of the above options are solutions if you’re serious about your career as a creative writer who is trying to break into the literary game.

At the same time, few of us have thousands of dollars to hire someone who can actually get your manuscript in proper shape to move forward in your career. If you do, great. Go for it. But most of us do not have that kind of money.

It’s simple to see. There’s a hole in the market, one that I believe any astute writer can see. I’m confident that I have a solution to this hole in the market.

I’ve created a book review service that audits your manuscript, listing every problem and proposed solutions. There’s no actual editing involved. That’s your job. However, after using this service, you’ll know the exact weaknesses that currently hinder your manuscript and how to address them.

The best part is this service only costs $50 USD per 10,000 words. For most us, that means the service costs under $500.

I absolutely do NOT recommend this service to anyone who isn’t confident in their “chops” as a writer. If you have some great ideas, but you’re not an experienced writer, you’ll probably end up needing to hire a developmental editor or maybe a ghostwriter to take your vision forward and execute these edits.

However, for those writers who are skilled and just need that extra pair of trained eyes, this service is a perfect fit.

Of course, since this service is new, and my blog is small, I need some help to get the word out to help writers. That’s where you come in.

If you know some writers who could benefit from this service, I’ll extend a 20% commission to you for every successful referral. Email me using the contact form below for more details and to get started.

In success,
Alfonso

Should You Hire A Line Editor For Fiction? A Copy Editor? A Developmental Editor? A Quick Guide To Making Sense Of It All!

March 2013 was a breakthrough month for me. It was the first time that I had my poetry accepted by a competitive literary journal. Despite majoring in creative writing at Beloit College, where I graduated in 2007, I didn’t have my first piece published anywhere until six years later. I didn’t think I was that good, and the professor who wrote “Don’t make a career out of this” on one of my short stories did wonders for my confidence. I quit writing for a while, but my friend Russell Jaffe got me engaged in poetry again, helping me with the basics of craft and offering me a spot in a poetry reading he had organized. I took the ball from there, rolled with it, and soon started getting my poetry published in many interesting literary magazines.

As much as I liked writing poetry and enjoyed the works of Bukowski, Neruda, Ginsberg, and many of the alternative/outlaw poets on the Internet in the journals in which I was getting published, I had always been, first and foremost, interested in reading and writing fiction. After I quit my job as a college instructor/librarian I spent a lot of time working on short fiction. Given my friend Rairigh Drum’s generosity in offering me a rent-free spare room in her and her husband’s home in Clarion, Pennsylvania, I had plenty of time to devote to writing, considering that I didn’t have to work much over the next few months as I had amassed a decent savings from my job. My stories were good. When I showed them to Rairigh, she was impressed. They were a far cry from the admittedly awful work that she remembered me passing her way when our campus clique would hang out. It was a big compliment to see how much, in her eyes, I’d improved. But improvement or good work isn’t enough. The fiction needed serious work. Rairigh again showed her generosity, working with me to develop the plot and characters, and showing me what to rewrite. The result? A number of my stories were published. It wouldn’t have happened without Rairigh’s edits. They’d just be stories that were good, but not good enough.

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Rairigh was my developmental editor, but what exactly does that term mean? How is that any different from a copy editor or a line editor, and why do I need an editor in the first place? The answer to that last question? Because every serious writer needs an editor. Sure, you can catch some things here and there and make your work better with multiple revisions, but every author has many blindsides when it comes to their own work. I would never release a novel or short fiction without going to Rairigh first, and I’d strongly suggest that all writers work with an editor before attempting to publish or self-publish their writing. Below are the types of editors and what they do:

Copy Editor

What they do: A copy editor ensures that your writing is free of any errors in spelling, grammar, or punctuation.

What they don’t do: Improve the actual prose or structure of a work.

Line Editor

What they do: A line editor ensures that your writing is tight, focusing on paragraph structure, sentence flow, word choice, and forward movement. Line editing usually comes with copy editing as part of the process.

What they don’t do: Improve or suggest ways to improve the structure of a manuscript.

Developmental Editor

What they do: Hiring a developmental editor provides the most intensive level of improvement of a manuscript. A developmental editor trims, rewrites, rearranges, and writes new passages/chapters of their clients’ work. Some developmental editors may just critique your work, offering suggestions for a writer to implement on their own.

What they don’t do: For most intensive developmental editors, line and copy editing are standard additions; however, for those offering critiques, line and copy editing are not included.

 

How I Started Getting My Fiction and Poetry Published in Various Presses

I graduated from Beloit College with a BA in Creative Writing in 2007.

The first journal that published my writing was O Sweet Flowery Roses, a non-competitive journal put out by my friend Russell Jaffe. That was in 2008. He ran some more poems of mine in 2009.

It wasn’t until four years later that I published my first piece in a competitive press, Michele McDannold’s journal Citizens for Decent Literature. That was in March 2013. One month later, I had a second piece accepted by Jack Marlowe’s Gutter Eloquence Magazine.

I was finally getting my writing published in excellent journals, alongside MFAs and prolific writers with many books to their credit. I had grown enough as a writer in the past decade to have reached a point of being able to write well, but the question was what now?

I was employed at Monroe College as a librarian, English tutor, substitute professor, and advisor to the campus Poetry Club. I truly enjoyed my jobs at Monroe College, but I knew I had a choice to make. I could either stay in academia and write a little bit here and there, or I could take a leap into the unknown and really move forward as a writer. I did what I knew was best and left my position at Monroe.

Some might consider it crazy to leave a good job that you enjoy behind to pursue your literary dream. Maybe it is. However, if I didn’t do that, I know that I wouldn’t be the writer for an upcoming blockbuster TV series’ accompanying book. I know that if I didn’t do that, I wouldn’t have my writing widely published. I know that if I didn’t do that, I wouldn’t have had any time to write period.

I left New York for a friend’s home in rural Pennsylvania. She gave me a free room. I wrote, and I let her skewer my writing, working with me as my editor until my writing was flawless. Afterwards, I sent out my writing and much of it got published.

Why did it happen? How did I go from ten years of no publications to someone beginning to make a name for himself as a writer? I credit it all to the bold move of burning my bridges and just going for it.

Now, of course, it’s not just about being bold. You have to mix boldness with intelligence and hard work. I wrote incessantly. I worked with an excellent editor who gave me great feedback because I knew that no writer can be objective about his own writing. I spent countless hours reading and researching various literary journals to find which ones would be appropriate matches for my writing. That’s how I did it. I realized that there is no other way, but that three-part process:

1. Writing: You need to write all the time. Some of your ideas will be great and others will not, but just keep writing. It’s the only way you will improve.

2. Working with a skilled editor: Rairigh Drum saved my fiction. My stories were good, but she made them excellent. I couldn’t have done it on my own. I needed her. All writers need editors.

3. Researching the publishers: No matter how great a piece of writing is, if you send it to a market that’s an inappropriate fit it’ll get rejected. The hours I spent researching literary journals online was not only an exercise in finding other amazing writers, but it really allowed me to find appropriate homes for my work.

I hope you found this blog post helpful—now go out there and make your mark on the literary game!

Six Mistakes That Publishers Hate

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As an aspiring writer attempting to build a name, you don’t want to irritate publishers. There are many mistakes that publishers hate. Please make sure to avoid the following:

1. Responding to Rejections – If your writing is rejected by a publisher, don’t respond to the rejection under any circumstances. A response is inappropriate. A response trying to convince a publisher otherwise, insulting them for passing on your writing, or bemoaning the rejection is a huge faux pas.

2. Poorly Edited Material – Even if your concept is interesting, if your writing is poorly executed you’re wasting a publisher’s time—and your own. You must have your fiction edited before sending your work out to a publisher. There’s no way around this step.

3. Material That’s An Inappropriate Fit – How do you imagine a publisher would feel if they had to reject (as they will) the most amazing piece they’ve ever read because it’s totally incongruous with their style? Show some respect and submit your writing to appropriate markets.

4. Fanfiction – I don’t really need to say anything more: it’s called copyright.

5. Ignoring Submission Guidelines – You can’t send seven poems to a literary magazine if they ask writers to send no more than three. You can’t send a short fiction piece as an attachment if the literary journal wants it copied in the body of an email. Always read the submission guidelines before submitting and make sure to follow them.

6. Unprofessional Query/Cover Letters – You’re not displaying personality, all you’re doing is showing a lack of professionalism. A too informal cover letter rubs many publishers the wrong way, even when submitting somewhere that appreciates edgy work or presents itself on their website as rather informal. You’ll be seen as an amateur, regardless of the quality of your writing.

Have you ever made any of these mistakes? It’s time to ‘fess up about your tragic experiences so that other aspiring writers can avoid making the same errors.

I imagine that sharing these experiences will also have a cathartic effect, but don’t quote me on that…

How To Maximize Your Chances of Getting Published

Here’s a scenario: You just completed a short story or poem. Now it’s time to start sending it out to literary journals, right?

How about this one: You powered through and completed your manuscript. It’s time to hire a literary agent or start sending your manuscript to publishers, right?

I applaud the enthusiasm of most aspiring writers, but please, SLOW DOWN.

There are two things that you must do first, before you can reap the rewards of a job well done:

1. Have your writing carefully edited.

2. Find a few literary magazines or small presses that could be an appropriate fit for your writing.

Sadly, even if you follow these two steps, the odds are that you’ll still face some journals or presses that will pass on your writing. However, if you choose not to follow this advice and submit poorly edited pieces to literary journals and small presses that are wholly inappropriate for your type of work, it’s likely that all you’ll meet with is rejection—and much of it.

Save yourself the stress. Do the right thing. Slow down. Have your piece edited, find a good home for it, and then watch how easy it can be to start building a name for yourself in the literary game.